Are you kidding?

This is a great article, except for one thing –

http://www.cnn.com/2012/03/16/living/body-image-kids/index.html?hpt=li_c1

Do you see what’s wrong?  Fat is the new ugly?  Bull hockey.  Fat has always been the taunt of choice on the playground.  Ask any fat kid – past or present.

The only reason anyone is noticing now is that not-fat kids are starting to worry about being fat.  Nobody cared as long as the only kids troubled by this kind of abuse were actually fat.

When it comes to bullying, I get so tired of the excuse that we can’t stop the bullying by kids because nobody knows “where to draw the line”.  How about nobody should be bullied?  How about that?  The kid with big ears shouldn’t be bullied.  The kid with a lisp shouldn’t be bullied.  The kid who is dumb or smart – they shouldn’t be bullied.

Yes kids can be mean.  Does that mean we should just let them be mean?  How about we don’t act like being mean is harmless?  How about we teach kids that being mean has consequences?

 

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7 thoughts on “Are you kidding?

  1. I completely understand what you are saying and I agree with you. There is no excuse for bullying. I just don’t know how we can teach kids this when adults do it all the time and they get away with it. They seem to be under the impression that bullying is protected by the freedom of speech.

    • I would hope that if we teach children that there are consequences to being mean, that perhaps in a generation or so we would all live in kinder gentler (or maybe just more polite) world.

  2. Absolutely. And I say this is someone who was not actually a fat kid, but tall & solid for my age, but who was always abused, ostracized, ignored, or ridiculed throughout school & even, goddess help me, into college. I was ridiculed sometimes, yes, for being maybe 10-15 pounds heavier than the cute, popular girls, but mostly for having Coke bottle glasses, being plain, being bookish & smarter than most of my classmates, being liked by the teachers, & above all, for having cerebral palsy…looking different, walking different, etc. The popular kids did not want to be seen with me, the popular boys would not date me (though that didn’t prevent many of them from trying to get me to go out into the woods with them, since not dating me only extended to never being seen in public with me). I was a geek, a nerd, a cripple, & a social pariah. Since I was also living with pretty much unremitting abuse of many kinds from my abusive alcoholic parents at home, childhood for me is a nightmare that I ‘survived’.

    Bullying is bullying, whoever does it, whyever it is done, to whomever it is done. And, no, fat bigots, it is not more ‘acceptable’ to bully kids who really ARE fat, whether it is done by the other kids or by adults who are doing it ‘for the kids’ own good.’ Non one should be bullied & you are so right, bullying should carry consequences.

  3. Hell, when I was a kid I wasn’t fat. In fact I was downright skinny until my mid twenties. All the same, I got fat taunts hurled at me. And I got bullied for having a fat mother.

    That was back in the dark ages before the ‘obesity epidemic.’

    I shudder to think what it’s like now.

    But whatever stick is being used against someone, it’s still bullying and it’s still wrong, and it needs to be stopped because it’s toxic.

    What is so damn hard to understand about that?

    Then again, I’m still wondering why it’s so damn hard to understand that different skin colors don’t indicate anything about whether a person is worthy to be treated like a person, and why it’s so damn hard to figure out the brain isn’t located in the legs and therefore a wheelchair user might not need to be spoken to as if (s)he is also unable to grasp basic concepts like direction or a price of an item for sale.

  4. The only reason anyone is noticing now is that not-fat kids are starting to worry about being fat. Nobody cared as long as the only kids troubled by this kind of abuse were actually fat.

    YES.

    How about we teach kids that being mean has consequences?

    Exactly. Yes, there will always be some degree of kids being mean. No, that doesn’t mean that we should just throw up our hands and leave them to unfettered meanness. Consequences won’t completely eliminate the bad behavior, but they can reduce it. And knowing that the consensus of society is that they do not deserve to be treated that way will help, too.

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